TALKING SHOP IN DEVELOPMENT: ADVOCACY

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Talking Shop pictured at #FRINGELAB with our collaboraters L-R Paddy McNally,  Ilo Tarrant, David Fennelly, Sean Squires, Shaun Dunne, Aisling Byrne,  Rebecca Guinnane, Lisa Walsh and Brendan Horan, with the fabulous Lauren Larkin pulling an Annie Lebowitz behind the iphone lens. 

February saw a week of exciting development for our new piece ADVOCACY.

MARCH 14TH, 2014

WATCH.

THIS.

SPACE.

Death of The Tradesmen JUNE TOUR DATES

Tradesmen (1)
Hold the phone. Stop the Lights. Rip up your Beyonce tickets. (ok don’t do that. never do that)

TALKING SHOP ARE GOING ON TOUR. And not in a figurative hen-party fashion. In an actual factual hitting the road for three whistlestop dates with three fantastic venues.

You can catch the award winning* Death of the Tradesmen

on June 6th in Drogheda:
http://droicheadartscentre.ticketsolve.com/shows/873492334/events

June 7th and 8th in Draoicht Blanchardstown:
http://www.draiocht.ie/events/day/2013/06/07/

and on June 13th and 14th in Riverbank Arts Centre, Newbridge:

http://www.riverbank.ie/shows/death-of-the-tradesmen

We are madly excited to be bringing Willie and Linda and their kitchen full of empty toolboxes on the road and we really really hope you will come along, bring a friend and spread the word. In case you need convincing here is what the press had to say:

Smart, effective and authentic… an audience would want to have hearts of stone to not be touched by a story that strikes home, in more ways than one.” The Irish Times

“an almost wondrous piece of theatre… beautiful and imaginative” The Irish Independent

“A moving reflection on working-class identity, family relations, the marginalization of skilled labourers and tradesmen, and the collapse of the Celtic Tiger as intimately refracted through the marriage of two people” ★★★★ Exeunt Magazine

“Stark, uncompromising and authentic” worldirish.com

“Dunne possesses an endearing sincerity and Larkin has a presence and honesty few young actresses can match” ★★★★ entertainment.ie

“Thought-provoking, entertaining. Amusing, poignant and ambitious.” thejournal.ie

“a story told with impassioned honesty and straightforwardness…” Irish Theatre Magazine

*winners of the Fishamble New Writing Award 2012 and The Lir Revival Award. Nominated for Spirit of the Fringe 2012 and Theatrical Production of the year by entertainment.ie 

But we don’t like to brag. Hence the asterix. In truth we were so excited, Aisling wouldn’t stop tweeting in shouty capitals for a week.

Wilinda’s return, awards nommo’s and Tradesmen take over THE LIR

This week is full of excitement. Not only does it mark the return of THE AWARD WINNING Shaun Dunne and Lauren Larkin (AKA Willie and Linda)  from a months stint in Ozzyland, (as if that wasn’t ENOUGH) but also will see us Talking Shopper’s ditching the snickers, and downing the toolboxes to attend the uber-glamorous ERICS (pretty much Ireland’s Oscars, except better) where we are nominated for Best Theatrical Production of the year. Here are Willie and Linda on the other side of the equator, where they happened upon glamorous, hat-toting Emma Fraser, also known as Death of the Tradesman’s costume designer. Image

Aren’t they lovely?

And its a very good thing they are coming home. As they are just in time to begin the move into their brand new kitchen situated at none other than THE LIR.from the 12th- 16th February at 7.30pm nightly…

Yes in case we haven’t bragged excitedly enough already, Talking Shop and Shaun Dunne were the lucky recipients of ABSOLUT FRINGE 2012’s Lir Revival Award (as well as the Fishamble New Writing award, and a Spirit of the Fringe nomination) Which means another chance to catch everybody’s favorite tradescouple negotiating the tense terrain of unemployment, as they worry that the suction on the hoover…just isn’t there anymore. You really don’t want to miss it. But don’t take our word for it. Here’s what the critics said:

Smart, effective and authentic… an audience would want to have hearts of stone to not be touched by a story that strikes home, in more ways than one.” The Irish Times

“an almost wondrous piece of theatre… beautiful and imaginative” The Irish Independent

“A moving reflection on working-class identity, family relations, the marginalization of skilled labourers and tradesmen, and the collapse of the Celtic Tiger as intimately refracted through the marriage of two people”  ★★★★ Exeunt Magazine

“Stark, uncompromising and authentic” worldirish.com

“Dunne possesses an endearing sincerity and Larkin has a presence and honesty few young actresses can match” ★★★★ entertainment.ie

“Thought-provoking, entertaining. Amusing, poignant and ambitious.” thejournal.ie 

“a story told with impassioned honesty and straightforwardness…” Irish Theatre Magazine

If THAT didn’t convince you, this just might. Look at that face.. (Thanks Sean Kennedy)

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And now all that’s left is to collect Willie and Linda from the airport, decide what we are wearing to the ERICS, and feel sorry for anyone who has to give a speech in the week following Jodie Foster’s.. OH AND ALSO to show you where to get your tickets:

http://entertainment.ticketsolve.com/shows/873489509/events

ARE YOU COMING?

GALWAY- ARE YOU READY?

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Shaun looking moody and broody perched over a toolbox? It can only mean one thing. DEATH OF THE TRADESMEN IS BACK. Already.

After a day spent loading toolboxes into a touring van,  the NEWLY AWARD WINNING (capitals to denote the excitement that still permeates such a prefix) Talking Shop  are getting ready and set (or should that be getting the set ready?) for a whirlwind weekend trip to Galway. Fresh from a fantastic Fringe which saw Tradesmen accumulate the inaugural Lir Revival Award, Fishamble New Writing award and a Spirit of the Fringe nomination, we are very excited to be embarking on first ever collaboration with Galway Theatre Festival.

We are running for 2 NIGHTS ONLY (Saturday 6th and Sunday 7th and 8.30pm) at the Town Hall Theatre (Studio Space) and would really very much like it if you could join us.

Tickets can be found by clicking HERE

Want to know what the critics said?

“Smart, effective and authentic… an audience would want to have hearts of stone to not be touched by a story that strikes home, in more ways than one.” The Irish Times

“an almost wondrous piece of theatre… beautiful and imaginative” The Irish Independent

“A moving reflection on working-class identity, family relations, the marginalization of skilled labourers and tradesmen, and the collapse of the Celtic Tiger as intimately refracted through the marriage of two people”  ★★★★ Exeunt Magazine

“Stark, uncompromising and authentic” worldirish.com

“Dunne possesses an endearing sincerity and Larkin has a presence and honesty few young actresses can match” ★★★★ entertainment.ie

“Thought-provoking, entertaining. Amusing, poignant and ambitious.” thejournal.ie 

“a story told with impassioned honesty and straightforwardness…” Irish Theatre Magazine

See you there 🙂

 

 

 

DEATH OF THE TRADESMEN, ABSOLUT FRINGE 2012 8th -15th Sept

Last night marked the launch of ABSOLUT Fringe (our fourth consecutive Fringe launch, can that be right? #nostalgiamoment) and we are delighted to announce that our upcoming production Death of the Tradesmen will feature in this years fantastic programme.

Running at Project Arts Centre from 9th-15th of September at 7pm (previews 8th) you can get your tickets right here:

http://www.fringefest.com/programme/death-of-the-tradesmen

Want to know more?

His name is Willy. He is a 54 year old tradesman. He has a bad back and a short fuse. He likes a pint of black and he tends to lose more than he wins when it comes to gambling. His hands are sore. They are calloused and dry and he is sick of standing. Running low on brass coins, dreaming of dimes and dollar bill signs – is there someone to blame? Or is this just the name of the game? In a country full of vacant spaces, empty places and ghost estates, Death of the Tradesmen is a new play about an army of men and the live register.

“Playful and intelligent”- The Irish Times, 2011.

“You’d have to be dead inside not to be buoyed by its youthful exuberance, its vibrant performances and its lack of pretentious cynicism”- Emma Somers for the Irish Times on last year’s “DO YOU READ ME?”

This show is made with Rough Magic Production Support

Kindly supported by The Arts Council.

                                                                                  

Image by Sean Kenneddy

TITLE, Tradesmen and wettest June that there ever was!

Well, we are all back from Cork where Shaun was living, working and getting persistently rained on during his TITLE residency for Solstice. On Sunday July 1st, with a book and letter in hand, Shaun presented some work-in-progress ideas for “Death of the Tradesmen”, and if you were around and watching, we would LOVE to hear your thoughts on the new project! Drop us a line at! talkingshopensemble@gmail.com

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Shaun’s TITLE Residency at Solstice Cork

We are excited, delighted, and will quite possibly be a little bit tearful (sniff) to be waving our Shaun off to Cork for the entire month of June, where he is set to take part in Solstice Cork’s amazing new residency TITLE. Shaun will be working hard, under the fantastic mentorship of Thomas Conway and other Cork based artists, towards the creation of a work-in-progress production that will be performed as part of Solstice on the 1st of July. 

“Death of the Tradesmen” is the piece I am developing about unemployed tradesmen in their fifties in Dublin and Ireland. The piece is inspired mainly by my father, a carpet-fitter who has been largely unemployed for the past five years. Following the collapse of the Irish economy and property industry, the tradesmen I am looking to represent are men who suddenly found themselves hand to mouth, arguing in dole offices and pleading with relieving officers. They are men who returned to education and started engaging with computers for the first time very recently. My main impulse lies in creating a document, a performance, that chronicles the lives and educations of these tradesmen from broke, to boom and back to bust again.”

It’s an idea we have been getting very excited about at Talking Shop over the past few months and we think you will too. Watch this space and in the meantime, take a peek at the Solstice website to find out more.

PS: Want to buy tickets to the work-in-progress showing? Click Here. and we’ll be seeing you in the Rebel County…

do you read me? rehearsals.

Week three: 

The show evolves from a large sprawling tangle of ideas; it curls up it’s edges and tightens it’s centre, and starts to feel like something solid, something layered, complex, structured. It is a product of a mad few months, of events, changes, of what happens when things happen.

Things happen to us – a visit to a computer repair shop and a sleepover in a hospital. More frequently, things happen to ideas. They move around, slide about in the space, on the page, in our heads while we try to sleep.

Ideas come as text – Shaun writes. He writes during the day and after we leave at night. He puts text to ideas – moving towards performance – we add sound, light, bodies. Ideas come as we learn more. We read about chakras. We decide which of our chakras is ‘outta whack’. We do yoga. We dance to Snoop Dogg. We watch psychic Sally on Sky Plus. We try to tell the story without words. We talk about the Church. Recurring words are – belief, disappointment, comfort, habit, affect, angels.

The image of an angel recurs.

The dynamic in the room is that we explore all of the various ideas and see whats in them – what theatrical moments are there, what images, what sounds, what event occurs when we put them on their feet. We improvise; riff; jam. The piece evolves. We change one thing – everything falls in to place. We change another – it all comes apart.

There is a lot of laughing. It feels momentous, like it should be underscored by an anthem. We print new scripts and make a cup of tea. We read the new draft and make plans for the new week.


The Year of Magical Questioning

Questions. We have a lot of them. At the moment, at Talking Shop we’re asking a lot of questions.

We’re trying to get alot of answers. We’ve been reading our horoscopes. We’ve been wondering what our granny would say. We’ve been saluting magpies. And investing far too much in the lyrics of Lykke Li’s new album. See there’s a lot going on. It’s been a hectic few months for all of us.

But more than that, we’re all caught up in our next project. Its leading us into the sort of creative obsessive spiral that you find yourself in when you know that something you’re working on is a little bit magic.

Yesterday, Shaun visited a medium. He visited a medium to see what he’d say. He visited a medium to see what happened there. To see why people go to talk to mediums. Again, more questions…

Shaun came to me with this idea. He wants to know why – why we ask why?

Our next project is about belief. About coping. About seeking reassurance. Making Home Bird was a huge break-through for us a group of artists. Our aim has always been to make theatre that connects specifically to the now, that tries to articulate something of what it is to be living here, now. With Home Bird, the conversations that it initiated showed us just how much people want to connect with what they come to see. Audiences want to talk about what we’re doing, but more than that, we all want to talk about where we’ve found ourselves.

A huge idea that ran through Home Bird was the idea that we’ve all been told as Grace Dyas would say ‘the sky fell in’, that the partys over, that we’re fucked, that theres no way out. But then as Shaun argues ‘you walk out on your street and everything looks the same’. Because people are getting over the shock of the meltdown. We’re getting on with it. We’ve stuck our heads above the ground, looked around and discovered people are still going about their business.

We’re coping.

How humans react to crisis and change is fascinating. Habits and belief-systems. Superstitions and rituals. Obsessions and compulsions.

So we’re making a show about it. What it will look like, feel like, sound like or do, we don’t know. We still have a lot of questions which is as good a place to start as any.